Corporate Fitness and Active Aging

Meditation for Beginner's

ThinkstockPhotos-79214896.jpgDaily stress can make you unhappy and irritated, which in turn affects your overall health. Meditation is a simple addition to your daily activities that can help improve your quality of life and put you in a more positive mindset.

How Meditating Helps You Emotionally

Although you may feel like there is no time to meditate because of everything on your plate, it actually helps you become more focused and productive to get those things done and feel more calm while doing it. You can correct your thoughts from a more negative mindset to a positive one and understand why you feel the way you do.

Your mood will fluctuate and meditation can keep things on a more even keel to prevent anxiety. You can then handle outside situations that arise without feeling out of control. Just a few minutes a day will help reduce overall anxiety, stress, and even depression.

How to Get Started

Here is a step-by-step guide to start a simple meditation practice.

  1. Take a comfortable seat with your legs crossed and ensure your posture is proper.
  2. Place your hands in your lap with both palms facing up.
  3. Let go of tension in your back and soften your jaw.
  4. Keep your eyes slightly open.
  5. Focus all your thoughts on your breath. As you breathe in, imagine it is all positive blessings that surround your life. As you exhale, blow out all negative thoughts and distractions.
  6. Continue until you feel relaxed and peaceful.

Meditation doesn’t need to take a large chunk of time. Even 10–15 minutes daily can make a big difference in your health and wellness. Try it first thing in the morning to start your day off right, at the end of the day to de-stress, or in those moments when you feel the most overwhelmed—whatever works best for you!

When a corporate fitness center isn't possible, how do you get your employees to move more?  Check out our free download for tips for adding exercise, click below!

Download Now

Topics: stress health and wellness meditation depression anxiety

The Importance of Being Your Own Health Care Advocate

It is safe to generalize and say the majority of people put a lot of trust in their doctor and admire them simply for their level of education. After all, they did go through many years of extensive and exhausting studying and training in order to earn the title of “Doctor.” They even have a decent health grade and framed certificates around the office, but does that mean we should put all of our faith in them and make them 100% responsible? Well, not exactly.

overwhelmed_senior_ThinkstockPhotos-471557740There are a lot of checks and balances in place when it comes to health care. You have nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, physician’s assistants, physicians, surgeons, and more, but what if all of these fail? Though it may be rare, it does happen. So who should ultimately be accountable? You. 

Too often, patients sit in a doctor’s office and are given loads of information, which might as well be told in a foreign language, all wrapped up in 5 minutes. The patient sits, smiles, and nods, thinking (or pretending) that they followed every detail that was spilled out to them. We assume the medications and dosages we are being prescribed are necessary and safe.

Kelly’s Story

A friend of mine, who we will call Kelly, was not feeling well and had arrangements to fly later in the week. To avoid being uncomfortable during her travels, Kelly reached out to her doctor. Kelly’s doctor was out of town, but the partnering doctor was available to see her. Without hesitation, the partnering doctor prescribed Kelly an antibiotic, and, without any questions, Kelly picked it up at her local pharmacy. A week later, Kelly felt extremely foggy-headed and enormously sluggish, and started developing rashes, painful headaches, very achy joints, and more. 

Kelly put her week on replay, trying to figure out what she had done differently that could cause such a major downward spiral in her physical health. Then it hit her: the antibiotic. She quickly started searching for answers and within seconds, from a simple Google search, she found it. Kelly was prescribed a sulfa drug, which is the number-one drug that should be avoided if you have lupus. Because the doctor seemingly did not even glance at Kelly’s files, the pharmacist did not pay attention to her log of current medications, and Kelly did not think twice about a doctor’s advice, she had the worst lupus flareup she had ever experienced.

How to Advocate for Your Own Health Care

Why do we assume all instructions are best for us because of a health professional’s level of education and authority? It is our body, yet we blindly and mindlessly do as we are told. Why is it difficult to be vulnerable and admit that we do not understand the information we are given during our visits? When did we lose our curiosity or stop asking “why?” You are at the office seeking medical advice, so seek it! Here’s how:

  • Ask questions.
  • Have logs and questions written down before you walk into the office.
  • Make the doctor or nurse write down information for you.
  • Ask for the doctor to explain what the lab results mean, not just rattle off numbers that you can read yourself. Then ask for copies of the lab results.
  • Remind all health professionals involved of your medications and lifestyle changes.
  • Request print materials related to your diagnosis. If your doctor is not willing, it may be time for a new doctor.

Remember, you are part of the team that makes decisions toward improving your health and wellness. Be involved, be informed, and be okay with asking for help when you don’t understand. Be your own advocate.

Your health is important, check out our quick read to see why exercise is important in aging well, download it below!  

 Download now

Topics: senior wellness health and wellness wellness health care

Free Group Fitness Classes Help One Participant Take On Cancer

SDropcho_photoIf you work in fitness, you know that for some members, the only way to engage them in regular exercise is through a group class setting.  Some people love the energy of a group effort, others like that they can blend in, and still other participants like group classes because of the ease of simply following real time instructions from a motivating teacher. 

For Sheila Dropscho, it’s the group atmosphere that keeps her coming back to NIFS-led classes at Broad Ripple Park in Indianapolis. She also walks and rides her bike for exercise, but when I talked to her about her experience with the classes she’s been attending for the last several years, the enthusiasm in her voice was palpable and she couldn’t say enough about the positive impact the Indy in Motion classes have had on her life. 

Indy in Motion is a partnership between the Marion County Health Department, Indy Parks, and NIFS.  The group fitness classes, held at a variety of Indy Parks, have been available for years and are offered at no cost to participants.  The formats and locations have evolved over time to meet the interests of the attendees at each site.  The program is a fantastic resource for people across the city to have access to free group fitness classes taught by some of the best instructors in the area.  To get a better idea about classes and formats available through Indy in Motion, click here.  Be sure to call the park to confirm that the information on the site is current.

Sheila learned about the Indy in Motion program through an article in the paper several years ago. When her youngest daughter went off to college, Sheila found herself with more time to commit to her personal health and she decided to give the program a try.  While Broad Ripple Park is her home base, she also takes Indy in Motion classes at Washington Park on the city’s east side. 

Sheila’s favorite class at Broad Ripple is Zumba® on Tuesdays and Thursdays; she tries not to miss it.  Sheila loves being around the other participants and watching their progress, but it’s the instructor, Nicole, who provides exactly the motivation Sheila needs to keep coming back. Nicole’s healthy tips, her intensity with the music, and her genuine concern about the participants are all part of what help Sheila feel great about the exercise and keep her coming back. 

Sheila’s consistency at class hit a snag when she was diagnosed with breast cancer recently.  She progressed through a mastectomy as well as a course of chemotherapy.  And she’s proud to say she is cancer-free.  But she credits her hard work in the group fitness classes and her good health going into the diagnosis for the relative ease with which she handled the challenging cancer treatment so well. 

Sheila said, “People were stunned that I was able to work my four 10 hour days during my chemo.  I don’t know that I would have been able to do that without that foundation.”

After recently undergoing reconstructive surgery and dealing with a complication from that process, her doctor has advised her, for now, to simply walk for exercise.  Sheila has been compliant with the doctor’s orders, but she confided that she’s more than a little bit eager to get back to her Tuesday/Thursday rhythm with Zumba®.

When Sheila’s ready, her class, and her instructor Nicole, will be there to help her get her groove on again.

Ready to bring group fitness classes to your Indianapolis audience?

Find out more >

Topics: health and wellness testimonials group fitness

What If: Health Care Collaborated with Exercise Specialists?

Throughout 2015, we’ll be blogging about our dreams for corporate wellness, fitness, and aging well. Some of the content will represent a gentle “poking fun” at the industry, but it’s all written to stimulate thought about what really could be if we put our heads together and started mapping out what’s really possible in the realm of individual wellbeing. We hope you’ll join the conversation by commenting on the blogs, giving us additional ideas about which to write, and/or by finding us on Twitter at #wellnesswhatif.

fit_scanYou’ve heard the saying, “It takes a village to raise a child,” right? The idea is that a child needs a whole village worth of support, influence, education, and diversity to be raised as a healthy and vibrant member of society. If we look at individual wellbeing through a similar lens, I would say that it takes a team to help an individual be well. 

When I think about the generally poor health (admittedly, I tend to focus on physical health) of adults in the U.S., specifically preventable issues, I wonder how much is connected to adults simply not knowing how to choose better health and how much goes back to adults making unhealthy choices even though they know better.

Let’s face it, there are a lot of external players who influence an individual’s health. I can’t get into all of those factors here, but I do want to focus on the potential for a better relationship between health care providers and exercise specialists. What follows are some of the historical challenges, as well as some what if ideas for working better together to take a team approach to individual wellbeing.

When I was working in corporate fitness several years ago, it wasn’t uncommon for me start talking with a new member about her goals for exercise and learn that she came to see me because her physician recommended she start exercising. In further conversation, I would learn that either the doctor provided no guidance on how often, how much, what intensity of exercise would be best; or (sometimes worse) the physician provided recommendations that were not practical for the individual.

It was always so helpful, when working with individuals who had a complicated health history, to get a physician recommendation that took into account that complex health picture. With more information from the doctor, I was able to write a more effective exercise prescription. But more often than not, the physician is hurried, and filling out one more form isn’t top on their list, so I’d get an almost blank form returned with little more than their signature. 

What if physicians had more time for discussion with patients about preventive health?

I think at least some of the barrier, though I’ve never heard anyone actually articulate this, is the image of the personal trainer. The certifications available for personal trainers are many and varied in terms of their rigor, and it leaves a lot of question about credentials. Licensure has been debated for years in the industry, and although the discussion varies by state (currently Louisiana is the only state with licensure requirements for clinical exercise physiologists), I think the reason licensure is even on the table is because requirements for certification are so widely varied, it’s tough for even a well-educated individual to get to the bottom of what “certified personal trainer” really means.

What if all certifications had to meet a specific standard that raised the bar for education and experience?

The American College of Sports Medicine released an Exercise Is Medicine campaign years ago with the goal of having physicians make regular exercise a part of their recommendations for practitioners to their patients. The program includes guidelines for health care providers as well as for exercise specialists to interact in the best interest of the public. While some progress has been made on the partnership between the medical community and exercise professionals, there is much work to be done to bridge that professional relationship for the improved outcomes of the patients.

What if health insurance supported visits with a certified exercise specialist as part of a prescription for better health? (This would not be unlike counseling from a registered dietitian that accompanies a diagnosis of diabetes.)

What if general practitioner offices hired exercise physiologists to counsel patients right in their offices?

What if medical training provided some insight into exercise prescription, and curriculum for exercise physiologists provided insight into what the doctor has to accomplish with a patient in an office visit?

We have a long way to go to build a strong village that contributes positively to individuals’ health, and this health care + exercise practitioner discussion is only one portion of that village. What other areas are you passionate about? Where do we need to build a better village to help individuals make healthier choices?

Read our case study, how partnering with NIFS and putting a qualified fitness professional in their new facility helped jump start this fitness program.

 NextGear case study

 

Topics: health and wellness exercise and wellness what if

Active Aging: What are the benefits of getting a massage?

knee_painHow many suffer from joint pain and inflammation?  Feel stiff and sore? Deal with lack of circulation, feel tired, depressed or have lack of energy, even have trouble sleeping? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then the big question is why are you not getting a massage?!?

Getting a massage is a proven way to reduce some of these issues.  Because we are living longer and keeping much more active, our muscles, joints and bones will develop forms of stiffness, aches and pains.  In addition we start to have limited range of motion or flexibility.  Aging brings about many other conditions that affect our bodies, such as osteoporosis arthritis, back pain and reduction in circulation. Massage therapy cannot cure these issues, but it has been proven to alleviate them.  A good licensed massage therapist can use techniques that focus on areas of the body to gently get to those muscle contractions or knots, making the muscles feel less stiff with more capability to move. 

Feeling down and depressed? Guess what? Getting a massage can actually help improve your mental health.  A regular massage can play an important role in boosting moods by providing that much needed contact.  Sometimes certain oils or creams used in massage therapy are another form of enhancing mood. 

Can’t sleep? Guess what? That’s right a massage can help you sleep better! Massage Therapy has been proven to relax the body, reduce stress and even assist with concentration.  When you get a massage, you can throw away your worries or even think about things as you relax, therefore, not having to think about them when you’re ready for sleep.

So now that you realize how good massage can be follow these helpful tips prior to setting up an appointment:

  • Always consult your physician and research your massage therapy options. 
  • Look for a therapist who specializes in working with active agers.
  • The words gently or soothing in the types of massage descriptions.
  • Always get referrals
  • Verify that they are licensed.  

The question is not why should I get a massage?  The question should be why not get a massage?

 

Your community fitness center is more than just group fitness classes, check out our white paper and how you can create a culture of wellness in your community.

Download Now

Topics: senior wellness active living health and wellness

Employee Health: Five Tips for Sun Safety

outdoors2Sunshine and summertime is heading our way. With the weather temperatures rising and sunshine beaming down it’s easy to overlook the damaging effects too much sun can have on our health.  You should worry about your sun exposure all year long, not just in the summer months.  Be proactive in your sun protection as the weather warms up and you and your family start spending more time outdoors.  Overlooking the importance of protecting healthy skin can have devastating and lasting effects on not only one’s appearance, but also overall health.  Treat your skin with the care it deserves and stay safe from burns, blisters, and over-exposure with these five simple tips for sun safety.

  1. A shot a day! Always apply 1 oz of sunscreen when heading outside for extended periods of time.  Use “broad-spectrum” lotion with a sun protection factor or SPF of 30 or greater. 
  2. Apply & Repeat. Be sure to apply sun screen at least 15 minutes prior to heading out in the sun and remember to reapply every 2 hours.  Consider your activities while in the sun.  If you are enjoying some time in the water or dripping from sweat after a hot summer run reapply more frequently.
  3. Protect your Eyes.  Sun glasses are to eyes as sun block is to skin.  Don’t just lather up with lotion and be done with it.  Investing in a pair of UV protection sun glasses is vital to your eye health.  Plus, it’s the best way to guarantee optimal vision while playing, riding, running, or relaxing in the sun.
  4. Get Dressed to go out in the Sun. So what if its 70 degrees outside, you still need to put some clothes on.  Wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts, pants, and wide-brimmed hats when expecting to spend a day in the sun.  Unlike sunscreen that wears off in a couple hours, fabric doesn’t just evaporate in the sun.  Dress accordingly to protect your skin!
  5. Seek Shade.  Sitting under the shade of a tree or umbrella helps to significantly decrease direct sun exposure.  Although this is one alternative, it is not the only precautionary technique for limiting UV exposure. 

For optimal safety when out in the sun it is best to follow all five tips.  These simple proactive steps could determine how pleasant or miserable your future outdoor adventures are.  Keep that in mind the next time you step outside without adequate skin protection. 

Subscribe to NIFS blog

Topics: employee health health and wellness sun safety

2015 Fitness Trends, are you already incorporating these in your workout?

jungle_gymA new year means new trends to follow! What do you have planned for your workout routine this year? Hopefully, the plan is to either begin or continue your fitness routine, but possibly add more variety into it. Make it your year to become familiar with the endless options and try something new!

The new trends predicted to become popular and make you sweat at the gym this year are:

  • Body Weight Training
  • High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)
  • Treadmill Training

Wait, body weight training? What happened to lifting heavy? Body weight training is predicted to be the next big thing this year. This includes comprehensive incorporation of gymnastics, adult jungle gyms, uncluttered workout spaces, suspension training options, basic movements, and programming that is not as focused on the standard weight lifting protocols. This means back to the basics with lunges, squats, and push-ups. What are your thoughts? Will the benefits from body weight training be as successful as lifting heavy weights?

HIIT, the alternating bursts of exercises with short recovery periods, is a popular trend known for its quick fat blasting tactics. I mean, who wants to spend endless hours at the gym when you can just knock out about 20-30 minutes of HIIT? Trust me, that is plenty of time to get a ‘sweatastic’ workout in and definitely one my personal favorites. You can create quite the variety of workouts, allowing your muscles to always be surprised by what is next. Plus, the variety can keep it interesting and fun so you don’t get burnt out so easily!

Treadmill training is poised to be the next “it” workout, according to Health Magazine. I know many are not fans of treadmill workouts and are tempted to consider it torture, but Health Magazine names running as the oldest form of exercise. I, myself, would rather run outside than on a treadmill any day. That tends to become a challenge during the colder months, so I put together treadmill interval and speed variation workouts to keep myself from getting bored of my workout. With this up and coming trend, classes will allow participants to improve their running through speed and interval-based training drills. Participants will also have the chance to become more engaged in their workouts and can avoid the worrisome of how to log miles when it is cold or rainy, since training is indoors.

These workouts are meant to push your body’s limits. With the higher chance of being sore, there is a need for recovery - foam rolling, restorative yoga, therapy balls, dynamic stretching, and core strengthening are perfect examples. A good night’s rest is also important for recovery. Allowing for recovery time after an intense workout decreases your chance of overtraining your muscles and the potential for injuries.

So, now that you are familiar with the predicted trends, how will you log your intense workouts? We are in a generation that is highly involved with technology - fitness watches and Smartphone apps at our fingertips. Digital engagement keeps us motivated, gives us inspiration, and coaches us through our workouts. Do you have a favorite piece of technology you use to track your workouts?

Overall, what do you think about these trends? Are you interested in trying out something new this year?! Connect with a health fitness specialist in your corporate fitness center or local gym to get started on a better you.

Subscribe to our blog and recieve our Free Workout Friday blogs directly to your inbox!

Subscribe to NIFS blog

Topics: fitness health and wellness

NIFS: How does positive thinking impact your life?

“Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be." - Abraham Lincoln

I don’t know how many conversations I have had with people about their health and exercise routines that often turn into conversations about why they cannot participate in a certain activity.  When I try to put a positive spin on the situation, the response I get is “You are young, you don’t understand.”  I realize I am younger than the folks I work with and do not totally understand what it means to get older with a body that wants to do the opposite of what I want to do.  But, I shouldn’t be totally disregarded, as I do have an idea of how difficult it can be.  After all, I have worked with people with ailments since I was old enough to have a paying job.  Plus, I have experienced the unfortunate event of orthopedic surgeries and physical therapies to get back on my feet.

I have been told multiple times that I smile a lot and they wonder why I am in such a good mood so early in the morning.  My answer is typically “Why not?”  I am lucky that I have been given the “upbeat” predisposition.   Whether it’s through helping someone with their exercise routine or stopping to have a conversation that strikes their interest, I will do what works to help a person’s day go a little better.  Too often do people walk through the halls to their apartment with their head down or worse, responding to a “good morning” with “oh is it?”  There really is a term that works, which is “fake it till you make it”.  Which means do what you have to do to make yourself believe it really is a good day.    

positive_thinkierSo what does this have to do with anything health and wellness related, you ask?  Well, there have been numerous observances and studies focusing on how a positive or negative attitude affects a person’s health and recovery. 

The Mayo Clinic has given us a list of health benefits that come with positive thinking

Researchers continue to explore effects of positive thinking and optimism on health. The benefits that positive thinking may provide include:

  • Increased life span
  • Lower rates of depression
  • Lower levels of distress
  • Greater resistance to the common cold
  • Better psychological and physical well-being
  • Reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
  • Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

It's unclear why people who engage in positive thinking experience these health benefits. One theory is that having a positive outlook enables you to cope better with stressful situations, which reduces the harmful health effects of stress on your body. It's also thought that positive and optimistic people tend to live healthier lifestyles — they get more physical activity and follow a healthier diet.”

Think of the most negative thinker you know… Now, take into consideration the list above.  When I think of the negative thinkers in my life, once something “bad” has happened, they are immediately ranting about it, even long after the situation is over.   The more they talk about it, the more intense the story tends to get.  When they dwell on it, it seems as though they become distressed over the situation.  Sometimes it seems like the same thing tends to happen to them and they become depressed saying “why me?”  If depression becomes a factor, then as time goes on, depression starts affecting our health.  It’s easy to think negatively about most situations, which causes stress because you are upset about it, that can cause the person to have high blood pressure, high blood pressure results in heart conditions, which is detrimental to your overall health.

Basically, negative thinking can have a snowball effect.  Once one part of your life is affected, multiple parts may fall into the same pattern.  Before you know it, it has caused much more trouble than you ever thought it would with your personal health and worksite wellness. 

After reading this, do you think you are negative or positive thinker?  Do you agree with the affects a negative attitude has on your body?  Stay tuned for part two, where we will offer questions to ask yourself to help determine if you are negative thinker and what to try to turn your mindset around.  Until then, stay positive! 

Get the ebook:  Why Fitness Initiatives Fail

Topics: health and wellness

NIFS: Physical Fitness Standards, Men vs Women

running_3Every morning I am hitting up the NIFS Fitness Center working towards the goal to stay healthy and fit.  I see all types of people with different fitness interests; those who participate in group fitness classes, those who always do cardio, or those who strictly lift weights. No matter their interest, I am always curious about their fitness journey. Why did they start? What is their progress? Are they working towards a goal? My usual gym routine consists of mostly lifting weights and getting in some cardio as well. I try to keep it balanced, but it is occasionally difficult. Being female and lifting heavy weights just seems to be so wrong and unattractive to some these days, but why? Wouldn’t you think that women would want to be as strong or fit as men, but maybe without the bulkiness? This leads to me to explain a controversial article I read recently posted on the ABC news website discussing a Fitness Test controversy in Pennsylvania. The head of the Pennsylvania State Police claimed that the agency’s physical fitness standards for recruits discriminate against women. Overall, nearly all male recruits pass the test, while 30% of women fail. An implemented fitness test must pass the threshold rule; 80% must pass. A lawsuit was filed; asking a judge to order the department to hire women on an equal basis with men. The Commissioner said he did not want to lower the standards because new troopers perform the same job and lowering the standards would endanger safety, as well insult those who already met the standards. This controversial topic sparked my interest and thoughts on the physical fitness test standards for other situations, like the one administered in gym class.

With kids heading back to school, that means gym class starting back up too! Although the President’s Challenge has not been used since 2013 and new guide to promoting fitness in schools is used, a variety of schools once used this method of teaching kids how to lead a healthy life. The Physical Fitness Test recognizes students for their level of physical fitness by doing 5 activities; curl ups or partial curl ups, shuttle run, endurance run/walk, pull-ups or right angle push-ups or flexed arm hang, and the v-sit reach. Based on their results three awards are given. The benchmarks are specific to age and gender. The girls’ benchmarks are lower than the boys’. So, this is where I ask your thoughts. Do you think that fitness test requirements like the ones mentioned should vary between males and females or should they be equal? What are your thoughts on strength training to create a better you? I want to hear your thoughts! Connect with a health fitness specialist in your corporate fitness center to strive to improve on your own numbers. 

Subscribe to NIFS blog

Topics: fitness health and wellness

Active Aging: Why should I consume probiotics?

senior eating yogurt resized 600We see probiotics all over the nutritional world now. So many foods, especially yogurts, are offering probiotics and making sure they are on the front label. But you may be wondering what these probiotics are and why they are so important.

We're glad you asked!  Here are 3 of the best explanations as to how they help and why we should consider taking them.

  1. Replace what we kill – We hear about bacteria in the body and automatically think that it is all bad, but we rely on an average of 500 different species in our intestines to digest our foods and process our nutrients. There is so much in our food today that helps kill these bacteria. It has been shown too that even one round of antibiotics can drastically decrease the amount of good bacteria in our body. The top four bacteria to look for are: Lactobacillus bulgaricus,  Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacteria.
  2. Digestive Health – So now we know we need to replace the bacteria that we kill and we know where it lives.  It’s time to see just what they do for us. These bacteria help break down and work through all the foods that we eat. This helps our body to use less energy while breaking down the foods and increases the absorption rate of all the nutrients that we eat. Both the Vitamin B’s and Vitamin K are processing are greatly increased by these bacteria. And don’t forget these are two vitamins that are responsible for giving us energy. When you think about it these bacteria are great energy boosters for us! We use less energy processing food and gain more energy from our foods. Finally all this bacterial helps regulate our digestive system. It is amazing the effect these tiny things have on our bowels. Once everything is in balance there is no more constipation or diarrhea or the bouncing back and forth between the two.
  3. Infection Prevention – Wait doesn’t bacteria cause infections? The answer is yes and no and to be even more confusing some of the good bacteria start with the name of bad bacteria as well. At first look what came to mind when you read Streptococcus thermophilus? Probably strep throat right? Well believe it or not this is a good bacteria and it does not cause strep throat. It actually helps with lactose intolerance and other irritations of the digestive track. Yeast infections are caused by the lack of good bacteria in our bodies. The yeast grows rapidly in warm moist areas and the bacteria are there to consume it. Lack of these bacteria has also been linked to urinary tract infections, bladder infections and kidney infection.

As you can see these little bugs are very important to our ability to digest, receive energy and stay overall healthy. These bacteria are found in many of the yogurts such as Activia®, Oikos® and Kefir. If you are lactose intolerant don’t worry there are soy and coconut based yogurts and drinks for you too. 

Subscribe to NIFS blog

Topics: nutrition active aging health and wellness